Episodes

Code[ish] • Tuesday, September 10th 2019

34. An Introduction to Rust

Carol Nichols and Jake Goulding

You couldn't find a more perfect pair of guests to talk about Rust than Carol Nichols and Jake Goulding. Carol and Jake write books that teach Rust, maintain websites that allow users to run Rust samples, record videos about Rust, and also manage the Rust Belt Rust conference, where Rust developers congregate in the Rust Belt region of America. Carol has a background in Ruby, and always sought to eke out more performance and less memory consumption. Jake has a background in C, but recognizes that it places a heavy burden on a programmer to be mindful of memory leaks and segmentation faults.

Rust is a fantastic programming language from Mozilla. It has a much simpler and intuitive...

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    Deeply Technical Rust systems programming memory efficiency
Code[ish] • Thursday, September 5th 2019

33. GopherCon 2019 Spotlight, Part 2

Aaron Schlesinger, Beyang Liu, Liz Rice, and Johnny Boursiquot

Aaron Schlesinger is the core maintainer on Athens, an open source on-prem module proxy. He walks through the history of packages and modules in Go, and introduces how Athens satisfies the needs of developers. Go modules allow you to serve up a Go project's dependencies via an API; Athens implements that API--and integrates with other implementations of the API as well--to simplify dependency management, no matter where the code is stored.

Beyang Liu is the CTO and co-founder of Sourcegraph, a company that focuses on developer tools. They use Go to build high-performance code search, code intelligence, and jump to def functionality that works across repository boundaries and across...

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    Deeply Technical golang modules Kubernetes containers newbies developer tools performance
Code[ish] • Tuesday, September 3rd 2019

32. GopherCon 2019 Spotlight, Part 1

Nick Gerakines, Jessica Lucci, Tim Raymond, Jay McGavren, Carolyn Van Slyck, and Robert Ross

Chris Castle recently attended GopherCon 2019 in San Diego, and captured small conversations from many different Go community members. In Part One of a two-part episode, he had several conversations with GopherCon speakers about what they were building.

Nick Gerakines is the Director of Software Engineering at Mattel, the toy company. Mattel has several toys with Internet connectivity, and Go is the primary language used for all of their connected products, whether it's to support authentication and parental controls, or providing product catalog and product instance information. A lot of core gameplay mechanics, such as the number of "miles" a car has ridden on a track, are...

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    Deeply Technical Go Kubernetes CLI programming Golang Gophercon
Code[ish] • Tuesday, August 27th 2019

31. Building Docker images with Cloud Native Buildpacks

Stephen Levine, Emily Casey, Ben Hale, and Terence Lee

Joe Kutner, an engineer at Heroku, leads the discussion on Cloud Native Buildpacks with Stephen Levine (engineer at Pivotal), Emily Casey (engineer at Pivotal), Ben Hale (steward of the Java Buildpack), and Terence Lee (engineer at Heroku). All of them are involved in overseeing the CNB project, and have used the technology in production at their companies. At its core, CNBs are an OCI-compliant alternative to Dockerfiles, except the container is built without very much developer interaction. By analyzing source code, CNB is able to determine the base image to start from, as well as which steps to undertake in order to ensure that an application runs correctly. It's a similar logical...

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    Deeply Technical cloud Docker CLI buildpacks
Code[ish] • Tuesday, August 20th 2019

30. The Infrastructure Behind Salesforce's Chatbots

Ian Asaff, Rob Hurring, Joslyn Esser, and Marvin Lam

As part of its product suite to automate a business' needs, Salesforce offers a Live Agent product, whose central component is a chatbot that can respond to a user's inquiries on the web or other messaging platforms, such as Facebook or SMS. A key design requirement of the chatbot is to be able to simulate human interaction by responding quickly. For an engineering team of eight, that means being able to offload as much operational responsibility as possible to Heroku's platform.

Salesforce's customers exist around the world, from Europe to Asia to the Americas. Heroku provide multiregional offerings for its dynos and databases that don't require too much...

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    Heroku in the Wild chatbot high availability Heroku buildpacks automation multi-region