Episodes

Code[ish] • Tuesday, July 14th 2020

Chris Castle, a Developer Advocate with Heroku, is joined by Tobie Langel, a longtime web developer and member of the World Wide Web Consortium, or W3C. The W3C is an organization where the standards that define the web are being built. It's a consortium of different industry players, like browser vendors,universities, and governments. These different stakeholders come together and decide how HTML, CSS, and JavaScript API should behave. The W3C effectively lays the groundwork for browsers to agree on how a website should look and behave.

They do this through long, thought out processes of standardization. If each browser ends up implementing its own HTML tags or CSS rules, then the...

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    Deeply Technical web standards HTML CSS JavaScript specifications Internet browsers
Code[ish] • Thursday, July 9th 2020

Special Episode: Giving Back in Today's World

Matt Pfaltzgraf and Brian Wetzel

Julián Duque, is a Lead Developer Advocate at Heroku. He's interviewing Matt Pfaltzgraf, the CEO at Softgiving, and Brian Wetzel, its CTO. Softgiving is fundraising platform that allows influencers—whether on Twitter, Instagram, Twitch, or other live streams—to create custom campaigns to raise funds for causes they care about. This is done through custom overlays, as well as rewards and gamification. They're also very hands-on with the content creators they work with, dealing with everything from the design to fundraising goals to determining the incentives for donators.

Providing this level of customer service has been both their distinguishing factor as well as the most...

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    Heroku in the Wild donations charities livestreaming websockets caching autoscaling
Code[ish] • Tuesday, July 7th 2020

75. gRPC

Doug Fawley

Robert Blumen is a DevOps engineer at Salesforce interviewing Doug Fawley, a software engineer at Google. Doug is also the tech lead for the Golang implementation of gRPC. RPC, in general, is a system which enables any client and server to exchange messages. gRPC is Google's extension to the protocol, with support for more modern transports like HTTP/2. This allows for features like bidirectional streaming and stream multiplexing. It also enables better interoperability with load balancing, tracing, health checking, and authentication.

To get started with gRPC, you would define your services and your messages using a language independent schema IDL protobuf. By explicitly stating what...

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    Deeply Technical gRPC protobuf client-server communication stream multiplexing flow control microservice T
Code[ish] • Thursday, July 2nd 2020

Special Episode: Celebrating our Pride

Bryan Vanderhoof, Jace Bryan, and Eric Routen

Erin Allard is a Platform Support Engineer at Heroku, and she's leading a conversation with Jace Bryan (who works on the Customer Centric Engineering team at Salesforce.org), Eric Routen (a family medicine resident in the New York area), and Bryan Vanderhoof (a manager on Heroku's runtime team). Each of these individuals come from different backgrounds, but they are united together in the larger LGBTQ community. After they came out, they sought ways to support other LGBTQ individuals who were not given the same opportunities as they were. Bryan focuses on helping homeless individuals, many of whom are children kicked out of their homes for being queer; Eric helps LGBTQ youth with...

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    DevLife LGTBQ+ allyship intersectionality underrepresented people in tech
Code[ish] • Tuesday, June 30th 2020

74. How Dev.to Built a Community

Ben Halpern and Jess Lee

Ben Halpern and Jess Lee are the co-founders of Dev.to, an online community dedicating to helping the developer community communicate. They've been described as a social network for software developers, where anyone from novices to experts can create a blog post to share their ideas. They worked on the site for a long time as a side project, and after they launched, the unexpected and overwhelmingly positive responded they received encouraged them to turn it into their full-time job.

Part of what makes Dev.to so appealing is that it's been designed to be fast. The site is designed to take advantage of caching at POP centers, so that individuals around the world can access the...

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    Heroku in the Wild community side projects inclusivity organization trust and safety CDN caching